Author: Painchek

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New facial recognition technology developed in Australia will help medical staff manage the pain of dementia patients who struggle to communicate. The PainChek app runs on smartphones or tablets and uses artificial intelligence to analyse facial expressions to assess pain levels. The software captures the information it needs in just three seconds and uses standardised pain scales but can be tailored to include patient-specific information such as medication. Read full article...

Go to Article Australians with dementia will now be able to communicate pain levels thanks to a new app being rolled out nationally. Listed pain detection app developer ePAT has teamed up with Dementia Support Australia to provide the technology to 150 consultants across Australia that could benefit up to 5000 people suffering with dementia each year. The app, PainChek, which has been approved by the Therapeutic Goods Administration, uses artificial intelligence and smartphone technology to visually analyse facial expressions, assess pain levels in real time and update medical records in the cloud. Sue Pieters-Hawke, who is a National Ambassador for Alzheimer’s Australia and co-chairs the Federal Dementia Forum, said global research had consistently proven that pain was poorly recognised, diagnosed, understood and treated for many people with dementia. “Anything that helps address that serious issue of people with dementia being in severe, untreated pain, is going to be a very ­important quality of life issue for those people and those that care about them,” she said. Dementia Support Australia estimates that more than 70 per cent of its clients experienced under-treated or undiagnosed pain, which impacted their quality of life significantly. A peer reviewed study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, showed that PainChek...

ePAT's rebranded PainChek™ app analyses a patient's face for pain. Picture: Getty. PainChek™ is the official new brand for ePAT’s pain detection app.(“For the pain you cannot C” is not the official slogan — but Stockhead thinks it should be.) ePAT Technologies (ASX:EPT) will roll out its electronic Pain Assessment Tool app under the new moniker this month at a Melbourne Alzheimer’s conference. Read full article:  Stockhead Health Website....

An app that measures pain by analysing facial “micro-expressions” is expected to be available later this year. ePAT Technologies (ASX:EPT) developed the app to help carers determine when someone who can’t communicate well is in pain. An initial version of the app for patients with dementia was cleared for use as a medical device in Australia by the TGA in July, and a second version for young children is in development. August 9, 2017 | Andrew Ramadge Stockhead  Read more.....

An electronic pain assessment tool developed by ePAT Technologies has been shown to be valid and reliable for people with moderate to severe dementia. The smartphone app for pain detection captures a brief video of a person, which is analysed using facial recognition software to detect the presence of facial micro-expressions that are indicative of the presence of pain. The study comprised 353 paired observations in 40 people with moderate to severe dementia (aged 60-98 years). Pain assessments derived from ePAT were compared with a widely used existing pain scale (Abbey Pain Scale), and the results showed a strong positive correlation between the two tools. Co-author of the study Jeff Hughes said being able to show the validity and reliability of an app used on a smartphone is an important step towards the adoption of more convenient technologies to derive accurate pain assessments. This improvement at point-of-care will deliver better health outcomes for patients. The ePAT app has been given regulatory clearance in Australia and Europe, and will be rolled out globally for use in patients with dementia who have lost the ability to communicate with their carers. A second phase will see an ePAT app for children who have not yet learned to speak. ...

It’s National Pain Week – a time to focus on and talk about pain especially in older Australians because pain is not a normal part of ageing – but it issomething we can tackle together which should be made easier with the help of a newly approved app. National Pain Week 2017 runs from July 24-30 and is convened by Chronic Pain Australia. If you or anyone you know is suffering from pain of any kind, it is important to seek medical help. Read full article [caption id="attachment_2507" align="alignleft" width="354"] The ePAT App will calculate pain severity[/caption] ...

A SMARTPHONE facial recognition app that can tell if a person is in pain has been on show to medical experts in South Australia. The Electronic Pain Assessment Tool (ePAT) app - which recognises when people who can't communicate verbally, such as people with dementia, are experiencing pain - was demonstrated to pain specialists at the annual Australian Pain Society conference in Adelaide. The app was developed by researchers in WA and works by taking a 10-second video of the patient's face and analysing it real-time for micro-expressions that indicate the presence of pain.  Article 2nd May, 2017  thesenior.com.au Read more.....

Researchers have developed a smartphone app that can tell if a person is in pain. Alexandra Ristway reports...

Researchers have developed a smartphone app that can tell if a person is in pain. Alexandra Ristway reports...