Industry News

PainChek CEO & Managing Director Philip Daffas, recently gave an update to Canary Networks on the company's recent milestones and future plans.        To read more from PainChek's CEO, click here....

PainChek has been featured on Channel 9 (WA), as the app that holds the key to better health care for dementia sufferers who can’t speak. PainChek is currently being trialled in Perth with Swancare, as a high-tech way to ease patients’ suffering. READ the full article here >>    ...

SwanCare is engaging facial-recognition technology to assist seniors with dementia and who are experiencing pain but are unable to verbally express their discomfort.   SwanCare’s pilot of the PainChek® application is one of the first clinical application for the technology in Western Australia and will run across 15 residents in the dementia support wing at SwanCare’s Kingia Care facility, with a view to extend use in the home and palliative care. PainChek® is the first-of-its-kind automated facial recognition app - originally developed by Curtin University researchers - that detects facial micro-expressions indicative of pain. Previous research of the technology has shown that PainChek® offers a valid and reliable new method to assess pain in people with moderate to severe dementia.1,2It is anticipated that the technology will reduce behavioural disturbances caused by untreated pain, which are then inappropriately treated with sedatives and antipsychotic medications. Facial expressions associated with pain are the same across gender and ethnicity - from the more recognisable frowning and grimacing to micro-expressions such as tightening of the eyelids and wrinkling of the nose. The PainChek App operates on a mobile phone, using the camera to take a short video of the face to assess pain indicators with facial recognition and artificial intelligence software. These...

The national dementia advisory service is ramping up its engagement with doctors in a bid to reduce the use of psychotropic medications among aged care residents.   This article was published in Australian Ageing Agenda, written by Natasha Egan.   The national dementia advisory service is ramping up its engagement with doctors in a bid to reduce the use of psychotropic medications among aged care residents. The Dementia Behaviour Management Advisory Service (DBMAS) and the Severe Behaviour Response Teams (SBRT), which are operated nationally by Dementia Support Australia, provide personalised multidisciplinary support to people experiencing behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. As previously reported, an analysis of SBRT cases for three months found the frequency and severity of severe behaviours were significantly reduced but only a slight decrease in psychotropic drug use. Associate Professor Stephen Macfarlane, who is head of clinical services at DSA, said the next challenge for DSA was to reduce inappropriate use of medications. “We had hoped that we would be able to demonstrate not only a massive decrease in behaviours but also a decrease in psychotropic drug prescription,” Associate Professor Macfarlane told Australian Ageing Agenda at the recent International Dementia Conference in Sydney. “We make recommendations around reducing psychotropics but only in about 10 per...

Providers are starting to reap the benefits of a game-changing pain assessment app, writes MARIA WHITMORE.   This article was published in the May - June 2018 edition of Dementia Technology.   Staff at Barossa Village Residential Services are using the PainChek app with 16 residents. The recent pilot of a pain assessment and monitoring device conducted as a partnership between Dementia Support Australia and the developer PainChek Limited has generated considerable interest among the aged care sector. Curtin University research fellow and app development team member Mustafa Atee says the collaboration between the publicly-listed company and DSA was critical to advancing its use in South Australia and Western Australia, where the pilot was conducted late last year. Since then, the PainChek app, which assesses pain in clients unable to communicate verbally, has been adopted by DSA, says Atee. The device is now in use in both states' DSA services, and will be rolled out across Australia to its 125 remaining consultants after its full integration into DSA's digital platform. The Class I medical device uses facial recognition software applied to a three-second video of a nonverbal client, combined with clinician input on their voice, movement, activity, behaviour and body, to assess the pain level in people such as...

The Dementia Support Australia (DSA) “PainChek® in Practice” pilot study from September 2017 to April 2018 confirmed improvement in behavioural problems of clients with dementia.  PainChek® has now been rolled out nationwide across DSA’s 150 consultants caring for up to 5,000 people with dementia per annum.  Findings of the pilot were presented in the international HammondCare Dementia Conference, Sydney during June 7th-8th in Sydney and are being submitted to a peer reviewed journal later this year.  The project initially commenced in two states, WA and SA in September and October 2017. DSA referred-clients (from residential and community aged care providers) with a behavioural problem(s) were followed over the course of service. From September 2017 to April 2018, 118 clients aged 57-98 years old with various types of dementias or cognitive impairments including Alzheimer’s dementia and vascular dementia were included in the project. Pain was one of the most common contributing factors (53%) to these clients’ behaviours. In those with pain identified as a contributing factor and with medical history provided, 27 (84.4%) out of 32 clients had at least one painful condition - most commonly arthritis. There was also a significant positive clinical association between pain and clients’ behaviours. When pain...

This article was originally published in the Hawkesbury Gazette and Newcastle Herald on 4 June 2018. "'Pain is a feeling of the past’ at Anthem. The Bowral nursing home has engaged PainChek to assist non-verbal residents including ones with dementia or strokes. Anthem’s pilot of PainChek is the first clinical application for technology in the Southern Highlands. Anthem care systems manager Jill Allsopp said since the introduction of PainChek, residents have suffered less pain and enjoy more of each day. “It’s so beneficial and efficient both time and financial wise,” Ms Allsopp said. “It has changed the treatment plans of some residents.” Ms Allsopp said anyone could apply the technology. “You don’t need a degree to use the app,” she said. “If you can push a button, you can use it.” If this one month trial is successful, PainChek will be implemented in nursing homes across the county and has the potential to be used for non-verbal children under the age of three. Read the full article here >> [caption id="attachment_1873" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Anthem Care in Bowral introduces PainChek[/caption]    ...

Australia's Good Design Awards, the highest honour for design innovation in Australia, were held at the Sydney Opera House on 17 May. PainChek™ received a prestigious Good Design Award® Gold Winner in the Social Impact category in recognition for outstanding design and innovation.   The Good Design Awards celebrate the best new products and services on the market, excellence in digital and communication design and reward emerging areas of design including business model innovation, social impact and design entrepreneurship. The Good Design Awards Jury said the PainChek™’s app is a “great product and beautiful integration of technology that will make a big difference to people’s lives. This system has real applicability and could be an incredibly impactful piece moving forward. Genuine issue and super promising with human application of machine learning to ease one of the many challenges of living with dementia. The system has been tested and peer reviewed and from a design and impact perspective is just plain excellent.” “Design to us is not just what a product looks like, but how it work” says PainChek CEO Philip Daffas. “Our vision was to create a simple, seamless and user-friendly app to make it easy to identify pain for those who don't have a...

In this presentation, Mustafa Atee will discuss a novel tool ‘PainChek™’, which is an app-based point-of care medical device approved for use in nonverbal adult populations including those with dementia.  Read more.. Solving-the-silence-of-pain-flyer PainChek - Solving the Silence of Pain in Dementia from Dementia Training Australia on Vimeo....

By Nikki Galovic 13 February 2018 Facial recognition app for pain An app that recognises when people who cannot communicate verbally are experiencing pain is the result of a project that is currently being worked on by a team of our scientists. Read more.....

Article / Publication Details: Karger Publishers in Basel, Switzerland, is a globally active medical and scientific publishing company.  Karger.com     ...

There’s a common misconception that pain is an inherent part of ageing, that as you get older and may develop health issues, pain is just something you’re going to have to deal with. But that’s not true, pain is often a symptom that can be managed with the correct interventions and treatments. Older people are less likely to report pain themselves, especially if they have cognitive impairment, but that doesn’t mean they are not experiencing it. Read more..  ...